How to Find a Criminal Defense Lawyer

When you are arrested for a crime, the only thing that can only help get out of a jam is with the help of a criminal defense lawyer. You can choose who wants to represent you which shouldn’t be a problem if you have money but if you don’t, you will have to settle with whoever the court appoints for you. But for those who can hire one, here are a few tips to help you select a professional.

First, when you meet the criminal defense lawyer, you should ask how long has he or she been practicing criminal law and also how many cases did they win. Surely you don’t want to work with a lawyer who is fresh out of college or has never won a case. You also don’t want to work with someone who chooses to settle the matter out of court very often because you will probably get the shorter end of the stick when you decide to go for the plea bargain.

The more years of experience this person has, the better because this professional should already know the ins and outs of the judicial system. That person may have already dealt with the prosecution in the past and knows how to get a winning verdict.

You should also check if the lawyer that is representing you is certified Criminal attorney. This will save you the time of asking how long this person has been in the practice because getting such recognition means you have actively participated in 100 cases involving the taking of testimony.

Naturally, you have to be comfortable with the criminal defense lawyer who will be representing you in the case. He or she should be able to give you updates like when is the trial, what strategy will be used during trial and other matters that may help make the outcome go in your favor.

Since you are already in your office, be sure that the criminal defense lawyer you are speaking with will be the one who will actually defending you and not handed over to another person in the firm.

Given that the practice of criminal defense work is their bread and butter, you should also discuss the fee arrangements. Some lawyers charge a flat fee while others do it on an hourly basis. It is better to get a flat fee so you are not charged every time you have to consult your lawyer over the phone or in person. You should also find out if this already covers the case should this go to trial.

While the criminal defense lawyer will do their share to maintain your innocence, you should also do your share so this can happen. You do this by cooperating with them so they will be able to come up with a good defense.

The best criminal defense lawyer to get is the one who is experienced. After all, a criminal trial may last weeks or even months before a verdict is reached. This may cost you a great amount of money but if you get a not guilty verdict from the jury, it is surely worth every penny so you can move on with your life instead of spending the rest of it behind bars.

Get Help From Your Criminal Defense Lawyer

Nobody ever wants to be accused of a crime, but this is a major problem which can affect pretty much anyone. Quite often people who are accused of a crime are desperate for some help but don’t know who they can talk to. It’s important that you get yourself a criminal defense attorney; many people assume that they are all the same. However there are actually many benefits if you spend time choosing the right one.

There are lots of great reasons why it’s important to find the right representation. First your lawyer will have to decide how to defend you. If there is no alternative then it might be best to make a deal with your prosecutor. If you feel you are innocent then you might want to fight it out in court. You will only be able to decide what you should do if you get quality legal representation so you can get an idea of your chances.

A good criminal defense lawyer can also make things happen much faster. Trials can find themselves getting delayed for all sorts of different reasons. This can create no end of problems including higher fees, lost earnings and inconvenience. If you can choose the right lawyer then you will be able to speed up legal proceedings.

Legal representation can help your case and give you the information that you need. As with everything in life you have a much better chance of succeeding if you have more knowledge about the subject – in this case, the law. The law is very complicated and understanding it can be a challenge, that’s why hiring professional legal representation is so important. criminal defense attorneys gain experience for the longer they work, and this means that they are less likely to make silly mistakes like some people. Professional representation will steer your case in the right direction and prevent any mistakes which could damage your case.

You must ensure that you choose a criminal defense attorney which will be able to assist with your legal proceedings and help you to understand them when the need arises. You should choose a lawyer which will have plenty of time to keep you informed, you can’t just choose an attorney which accepts every single case.

Choosing a lawyer which offers their clients a brilliant service which puts your needs first then you will be able to get all of the help that you need. Whenever you have questions which refer to your case you will then be able to get the advice. They will have plenty of time to discuss every detail with you. Not knowing what will actually happen to you is one of the worst things which can happen; the right legal representation will get rid of some of this anxiety because they can keep you fully informed.

criminal defense lawyers understand all of your options and will be explain them in a way that you understand. They will also speed up the entire process so that you don’t have as much time to wait. It’s important to spend time carefully choosing the right lawyer for your needs and ensuring that you choose one which will help with your understanding of your case.

Charges of Property Crimes

Property crimes are any criminal violation that results in the destruction or theft of the personal property of another individual. Ranging from vandalism to petty theft to burglary to arson, property crimes can lead to serious penalties for those who are convicted. The first major type of property crime is theft. This is simply defined as taking something that does not belong to you with the intention of never returning the item or items. Theft is a broad category of crimes and each specific offense is usually classified by how much was stolen or if there were any aggravating factors involved, such as violence or the use of a deadly weapon. Depending on what state the offense was committed in, petty theft is usually any theft of property under the amount of $500 or $1,000. Grand theft is any theft above that amount.

Another type of property crime is burglary. Although often thought of as solely a theft crime, burglary is breaking and entering for the purpose of committing a crime, any crime. This could be a home or a business premise and the law was designed to protect people from unlawful entry, even if nothing was stolen. Another aspect of burglary is that the perpetrator had the intent of committing a crime. This means that even if their attempts were thwarted, they can still be prosecuted and convicted. Another aspect of this crime to remember is that breaking and entering does not have to include physical force. While it can mean that a window was broken or a lock picked, it could also mean that one of the inhabitants was threatened or blackmailed into letting the burglar into their home.

Two other types of property damage that do not involve theft are arson and vandalism. Arson is the burning of a home or business. This crime is always charged as a felony as there is the real possibility that someone may be injured. Even if the building was completely empty, the fire may spread to surrounding areas and lead to loss of life and property damage. Whether this is committed out of revenge, for insurance purposes, or another reason, arson is a serious charge in every U.S. state. Vandalism is another crime that focuses on the destruction of property in varying degrees. From egging to graffiti to keying a car, any offender could be facing large fines and even jail time. If you were charged with any type of property crime, your first step should be to get in touch with a legal representative. No matter how hopeless you believe your case to be, having the right attorney on your side could make all the difference in the outcome of your case.

Your Conflict With the Law

Laws are rules of conduct that are accepted by the people and enforced by the state. Even this simple definition gives us problems. One of the problems is that laws, like the mini-skirt or a hair style come and go out of fashion. Behavior that we thought was outrageous a few decades ago is now acceptable.

When laws cease to be appropriate they should be changed. Unfortunately, laws are slow to change and society can move quite quickly. There are some laws, however, that never go out of fashion like robbery and murder. Oscar Wilde was maligned for his homosexuality; he was imprisoned and made a social outcast. If he was alive today he would be a celebrated television personality.

Even more confusing, instead of being black and white, we place laws on a point on a spectrum. At one end of the spectrum, we have murderers and armed robbers; we feel that their behaviour is definitely wrong. At the other end of the spectrum we have someone who accepts €30 for taking a friend to the airport but does not declare the income in his tax return. Both are displaying criminal behaviour but we view them differently.

In addition to state laws, we also have our internal rules of conduct. These were given to us by our parents and other significant people in our lives. We live by these rules, though we pay lip service to the laws of the country.

How many of us have done the “odd job” and been paid for it without declaring it to the tax authorities. This is against the law, but we do not view it that way. Problems arise when our internal rules conflict with the laws of the country.

It is not unusual for people who are guilty of a crime to believe that they have done nothing wrong. A man who has stolen a loaf of bread for his starving family will believe that he has acted within his conscience and punishment by the state would be wrong.

The culture of a society will also determine what constitutes correct behaviour. When differing cultures meet, huge rifts can appear and often violence erupts. Both sides feel that they are behaving correctly. In some cultures, beating a wife “to make her behave properly” is regarding as correct; in others it is frowned upon.

Even within the same culture, problems may arise. In a relationship, partners may have powerfully opposing views on fidelity, violence within the marriage and financial freedom.

It is possible that you have been affected by crime and cannot come to terms with it. What may be happening is that your internal rules cry out for justice, but the culture or laws do not require the punishment that you seek. It will appear to you that there is an injustice.

It is not unusual for us to see offenders bemused and even amused by our outrage because they cannot see the problem. We are angry and want them to admit that they were wrong in order to satisfy our own needs. If they make such an admission, they will not mean it, because they do not believe what they have done is wrong.

Criminal behaviour affects us all. When we experience it face to face, it is hard to accept. Often, it is not the financial loss that that gives us the problem; it is the intrusion into our property and lives that angers us and leaves us with a feeling of insecurity. Our sense of fair play and our internal rules of conduct have been violated leaving us confused, angry and depressed. It can take years to come to terms with such intrusions.

I have produced some therapeutic recordings on a variety of subjects and invite people to make suggestions for additional recordings. The full list can be seen on http://renaissancetherapyprogram.com. This article, for example demonstrates that we feel that the law may not represent our own views. This may cause us problems, and problems with the authorities. People may feel that a therapeutic recording containing some useful suggestions may be appropriate.

Vigilante Justice – When the Law Fails

People take the law for granted, until it fails. We assume that the man who steals our car or breaks into our house will be prosecuted and punished. What happens when that assumption is no longer valid? When the law fails to protect the citizens and punish the lawbreakers?
The small town of Skidmore, Missouri found out on July 10, 1981, when Ken Rex McElroy was shot to death as he sat in his pickup on the main street of town. McElroy had waged a twenty-year reign of terror over all of northwest Missouri, getting away with almost every crime in the book: rape, arson, kidnapping, burglary, theft, assault, you name it. The law seemed powerless to stop him; witnesses changed their stories; judges recused themselves from his cases; prosecutors dismissed indictments; the town marshal resigned.

I told the story of McElroy’s reign of terror, his shooting, and the ensuing silence by the numerous witnesses to the murder in the book In Broad Daylight, which was published by HarperCollins in 1989, and which won an Edgar Award for Best True Crime and was made into a movie starring Brian Denehey. I revisited the story in a twenty-five year anniversary edition of the book published by St. Martins Press in December 2006. This edition contains startling new information on the killing and the identity of the killers.

It is not surprising that after all this time the witnesses to the killing still have not talked about what they saw that hot July morning. You might hear them say something like “McElroy needed killing,” and what they mean is that the town believed it had no choice but to take the law into its own hands. In their view, the town had returned to the lawlessness of the frontier days, when individuals undertook their own protection at the end of a barrel. Indeed, McElroy was stalking, with a weapon, several witnesses who were scheduled to testify against him in a bond revocation hearing the next week.

You can argue whether what happened that day was morally right or wrong. On Larry King Live, King opined that taking a life outside the law was never the right thing to do. Others argue that it should have happened long before it did.

Behind the discussion is a very basic principle of civilized society, a contract between the government and its citizens: you give up the right to enforce the law and punish lawbreakers in exchange for the government’s promise to do it for you. Put your weapons away and the government–in the form of the criminal justice system–will protect you.

In general, when one party fails to a contract fails to live up to his obligations the other party is released from his promise. If the government cannot protect me, I am entitled to protect myself. If the law t cannot protect the town, the town is entitled to protect itself, to “take the law into its own hands,” as the saying goes. It’s a scary notion in many ways, and it certainly sets a dangerous precedent, in effect allowing individual citizens to decide when they are entitled to engage in “self help.”

One of the most intriguing aspects of the story was the very fragile nature of what we call law and order. We might think that the criminal justice system is rooted in reality through law and courts and cops; the fact is, the criminal justice system is rooted in perception. Once the people no longer believe that it works, it no longer works. If witnesses no longer believe the law can protect them, that it can catch and punish the lawbreakers, they won’t come forward to testify. Cops won’t put their lives on the line. Citizens won’t go to their neighbors’ aid.
In the last few weeks of his life, McElroy had reduced the town of Skidmore to a community where it was every man for himself. When McElroy fired his shotgun over a house in the middle of the night, the neighbors turned away. McElroy, of course, finally pushed the town to far. When the people, with good reason, lost their faith in the system, when they felt exposed and vulnerable to the raging of a violent sociopath, they undertook to solve the problem themselves, they exercised the fundamental right of self-protection.

If there is a lesson to be learned in this cautionary tale, it’s that the criminal justice system in the end is about protecting the citizens and when the citizens fail to perceive that the system is doing its job the descent into lawlessness is rapid and certain.